Generation #1 · Generation #1 (1-10)

Venusaur (#3)

There is a sense of mystery around them to which their slow, reflective nature only adds. Image Credit: Takamizawa Usui

Venusaur are mighty and sacred individuals, often nicknamed King of the Forest. Often the star of myths and legends, wild Venusaur often remain motionless for years at a time and only stir at times of crisis.

It was once thought that Venusaur was part psychic type because of its innate awareness of its environment, but scientists are now discovering that Venusaur may be able to connect to the mycorrhizal network of the forest, a connection that can span miles around.

Where to find one

Venusaur are rare in the wild and extremely powerful. On top of this, there is always the moral question as to whether you should catch a wild one. Ivysaur only evolve into Venusaur one at a time and they do so to become protectors of the forest. Scientists are only just discovering just how deeply these Pokémon are connected to their forest homes. Each Ivysaur accepts this special mission and will not be readily prepared to stop its cause.

I have known a few instances where Venusaur capture was necessary. In one awful case, a fire ravaged a whole woodland beyond repair. The council decided to build on the land and turn it into a Pokémon retreat, but the Venusaur in charge of that area was so distraught that he’d let down the Pokémon he was destined to protect, he quickly fell into depression. I, and a team of breeders, was asked to help him. We decided he needed specialist care. We found a trusted trainer to capture him and take him to a therapist. It took him a few years of dedicated care, but the Venusaur is doing well! Last I knew he started his own nursery.

A Venusaur’s power is very hard to tame. It takes a long time for this Pokémon to fully respect you if you catch it from the wild. For all of these reasons and more, I would instead recommend raising an Ivysaur to evolve to Venusaur. Though, I would only advise this for battle purposes. Venusaur is a hard-to-manage breed that have a lot of specific requirements. Think very carefully about the reasons you have for evolving him before doing so. Ivysaur live long, happy lives without needing to evolve and it comes quite natural to them.

Scientists are now discovering that Venusaur may be able to connect to the mycorrhizal network of the forest. Image credit: Marta Maszkiewicz

Raising for battle

Ivysaur evolve to become Venusaur at level 32. After they evolve, they can learn the moves Worry Seed, Synthesis, Petal Blizzard and Solar Beam. Of these, Ivysaur only learns one of these, so there is a benefit to evolving for battle. If you’re planning on delaying, I’d recommend evolving no later than 45 for learning Synthesis. Worry Seed can probably be missed, especially if you’ve kept Bulbasaur’s Sleep Powder and are happy with the accuracy.

Venusaur have immense power and can be a great battle partner. However, long gone are the days of sporty Ivysaur, and your Venusaur will tire very quickly in battle. Don’t use him against anything that uses speed, as you’ll be at a disadvantage. That’s not to say that his moves are slow, just his movement. Razor leaf, Petal Blizzard and Solar Beam are all intense, fast-paced attacks that Venusaur can perform with exceptional accuracy.

Keeping Venusaur happy and healthy

Venusaur need a lot of care, especially when they get older. They often find it difficult to move and will need consistent leg-strengthening exercises to maintain full mobility. It is advisable that you hire a personal trainer for your Venusaur, who will be able to plan a personalised activity plan to meet his specific needs.

If you have raised your Venusaur from an Ivysaur and wish to continue his development, I’d recommend stopping agility course training and begin wellness training. This is a new concept that was helping develop a few years ago. Essentially, a study into Venusaur battle statistics found that young Venusaur who had regular battle training were just as effective in battle as middle-aged Venusaur who had many more years of time to hone their skills. It is thought that by age 53 or so, Venusaur reaches its peak in terms of power. This makes some biological sense, as it is the time when he learns Solarbeam, his most powerful attack.

Wellness training comprises a mixture of grooming (leaf / claw trimming and exfoliating the skin), plant care (using fertiliser, nutrient food additives and carefully planned water / sunlight schedules) and mental development (puzzles, socialisation and work). This might not sound like training, but these all keep Venusaur happy and focused, which have shown some promising results in battle.

It is advisable to take some courses in plant care, as Venusaur’s plant will need similar care to exotic species

Overall

As a breeder, you come to gain a lot of respect for Venusaur and it truly is a miracle to see one. There is a sense of mystery around them to which their slow, reflective nature only adds. Venusaur are immensely powerful Pokémon that need a lot of care. They show great courage in battle, but often get tired and show their age.

It took him a few years of dedicated care, but the Venusaur is doing well! Last I knew he started his own nursery. Image credit: Laurie MacQueen

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